12 August 2010 · About 8 minutes read

Android: Double Taps on a MapView with Overlays

Download the source code for this post PushPin.tar.gz, PushPin.zip.

For the past few days, I’ve been struggling with the Android SDK to detect double-taps on a MapView with overlays. I’m working on Plymouth Software’s first Android app, which makes use of Google’s MapView class. The requirements are:

Despite scouring the SDK and web for tutorials, I could only find examples of either detecting double taps (using primitive timers) or adding a list of markers which could be tapped. After several hours, I finally managed to get somewhere. Check out the call for help at the end of the post though!

Creating the Maps Activity

After creating a new Android project in the SDK, switch it to extend MapActivity and add a MapView to the layout. I’ve also setup the MapView with things like built-in zoom controls in the initialiseMapView() method:

```xml

```

```java/* /src/com/example/PushPinActivity.java */

package com.example;

import android.graphics.drawable.Drawable;

import android.os.Bundle;

import com.google.android.maps.GeoPoint;

import com.google.android.maps.MapActivity;

import com.google.android.maps.MapController;

import com.google.android.maps.MapView;

import com.google.android.maps.OverlayItem;

class PushPinActivity extends MapActivity {

private MapView mapView;

private MapController mapController;

@Override

public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {

super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

setContentView(R.layout.main);

initialiseMapView();

}

@Override

public boolean isRouteDisplayed() {

return false;

}

private void initialiseMapView() {

mapView = (MapView) findViewById(R.id.mapView);

mapController = mapView.getController();

mapView.setBuiltInZoomControls(true);

mapView.setSatellite(false);

GeoPoint startPoint = new GeoPoint((int)(40.7575 * 1E6), (int)(-73.9785 * 1E6));

mapController.setCenter(startPoint);

mapController.setZoom(8);

}

}```

```xml

```

Adding Overlays

Next, I’ll add an array of Overlay markers to the map. I couldn’t find much high-level documentation on overlays, but from what I could figure out, the ItemizedOverlay class allows you to store a List of OverlayItems. Each OverlayItem is a marker on the map.

For this example, I’ve just used the default Android application icon as a marker. Let’s add a few Overlays in the initialiseOverlays() method, which is called from onStart() (not onCreate()). Note that I’ve also declared a property, placesItemizedOverlay which is a sub-class of ItemizedOverlay. The GeoPoint locations are from another tutorial I found during my research!

```java/* /src/com/example/PushPinActivity.java */

class PushPinActivity extends MapActivity {

private PlacesItemizedOverlay placesItemizedOverlay;

// …

@Override

public void onStart() {

super.onStart();

initialiseOverlays();

}

private void initialiseOverlays() {

// Create an ItemizedOverlay to display a list of markers

Drawable defaultMarker = getResources().getDrawable(R.drawable.icon);

placesItemizedOverlay = new PlacesItemizedOverlay(this, defaultMarker);

placesItemizedOverlay.addOverlayItem(new OverlayItem(new GeoPoint((int) (40.748963847316034 * 1E6),

        (int) (-73.96807193756104 * 1E6)), "UN", "United Nations"));

placesItemizedOverlay.addOverlayItem(new OverlayItem(new GeoPoint(

    (int) (40.76866299974387 * 1E6), (int) (-73.98268461227417 * 1E6)), "Lincoln Center",

    "Home of Jazz at Lincoln Center"));

placesItemizedOverlay.addOverlayItem(new OverlayItem(new GeoPoint(

    (int) (40.765136435316755 * 1E6), (int) (-73.97989511489868 * 1E6)), "Carnegie Hall",

    "Where you go with practice, practice, practice"));

placesItemizedOverlay.addOverlayItem(new OverlayItem(new GeoPoint(

    (int) (40.70686417491799 * 1E6), (int) (-74.01572942733765 * 1E6)), "The Downtown Club",

    "Original home of the Heisman Trophy"));

// Add the overlays to the map

mapView.getOverlays().add(placesItemizedOverlay);

}

}```

```java/* /src/com/example/PlacesItemizedOverlay.java */

package com.example;

import java.util.ArrayList;

import android.app.AlertDialog;

import android.content.Context;

import android.graphics.drawable.Drawable;

import com.google.android.maps.ItemizedOverlay;

import com.google.android.maps.OverlayItem;

public class PlacesItemizedOverlay extends ItemizedOverlay {

private Context context;

private ArrayList items = new ArrayList();

public PlacesItemizedOverlay(Context aContext, Drawable marker) {

super(boundCenterBottom(marker));

context = aContext;

}

public void addOverlayItem(OverlayItem item) {

    items.add(item);

    populate();

}

@Override

protected OverlayItem createItem(int i) {

    return items.get(i);

}

@Override

public int size() {

    return items.size();

}

@Override

protected boolean onTap(int index) {

  OverlayItem item = items.get(index);

  AlertDialog.Builder dialog = new AlertDialog.Builder(context);

  dialog.setTitle(item.getTitle());

  dialog.setMessage(item.getSnippet());

  dialog.show();

  return true;

}

}```

If you save and run the code now, you’ll see a map centred on Manhattan with several Android-esque markers scattered around. Tapping on one of the markers will popup an AlertDialog with the marker’s title and description. This is nothing more advanced than the standard Google reference documentation:

Android Markers

Detecting Double Taps

For my app, I needed to detect a double-tap anywhere else on the MapView, except where a Marker was displayed. To do this, I started to look at the GestureDetector class, and set about extending MapView to detect double-taps.

```java/* /src/com/example/PushPinMapView.java */

package com.example;

import android.content.Context;

import android.util.AttributeSet;

import android.view.GestureDetector;

import android.view.MotionEvent;

import android.view.GestureDetector.OnGestureListener;

import com.google.android.maps.MapView;

public class PushPinMapView extends MapView {

private Context context;

private GestureDetector gestureDetector;

public PushPinMapView(Context aContext, AttributeSet attrs) {

super(aContext, attrs);

context = aContext;

gestureDetector = new GestureDetector((OnGestureListener)context);

gestureDetector.setOnDoubleTapListener((OnDoubleTapListener) context);

}

// Override the onTouchEvent() method to intercept events and pass them

// to the GestureDetector. If the GestureDetector doesn’t handle the event,

// propagate it up to the MapView.

public boolean onTouchEvent(MotionEvent ev) {

if(this.gestureDetector.onTouchEvent(ev))

   return true;

else

  return super.onTouchEvent(ev);

}

}```

```java/* /src/com/example/PushPinActivity.java */

// …

import android.view.GestureDetector.OnGestureListener;

import android.view.GestureDetector.OnDoubleTapListener;

class PushPinActivity extends MapActivity implements OnGestureListener, OnDoubleTapListener {

// …

/**

  • Methods required by OnDoubleTapListener

**/

@Override

public boolean onDoubleTap(MotionEvent e) {

GeoPoint p = mapView.getProjection().fromPixels((int)e.getX(), (int)e.getY());

AlertDialog.Builder dialog = new AlertDialog.Builder(this);

dialog.setTitle("Double Tap");

dialog.setMessage("Location: " + p.getLatitudeE6() + ", " + p.getLongitudeE6());

dialog.show();

return true;

}

@Override

public boolean onDoubleTapEvent(MotionEvent e) {

return false;

}

@Override

public boolean onSingleTapConfirmed(MotionEvent e) {

return false;

}

/**

  • Methods required by OnGestureListener

**/

@Override

public boolean onDown(MotionEvent e) {

return false;

}

@Override

public boolean onFling(MotionEvent e1, MotionEvent e2, float velocityX, float velocityY) {

return false;

}

@Override

public void onLongPress(MotionEvent e) {

}

@Override

public boolean onScroll(MotionEvent e1, MotionEvent e2, float distanceX, float distanceY) {

return false;

}

@Override

public void onShowPress(MotionEvent e) {

}

@Override

public boolean onSingleTapUp(MotionEvent e) {

return false;

}

}```

Finally, make sure you change your main.xml layout file to use the com.example.PushPinMapView instead of the original Google version. This one caught me out whilst writing this post!

```xml

```

What’s going on?

The custom PushPinMapView creates an instance of GestureDetector and dispatches any touch events (onTouchEvent()) to the designated OnGestureListener. In this code, that is the context instance of PushPinActivity.

If the listener handles the gesture (it’s a double-tap), it shouldn’t not propagate any further (see below). For any gestures that aren’t handled, the GestureDetector propagates the gesture up to other listeners. In this case, it would be handled by the parent MapView gesture handling, which means we don’t have to override things like dragging the map.

Also be sure that your OnGestureListener class imports from the android.view.GestureDetector package.

Call for help…

Whilst functional, the code is still not quite perfect. According to the documentation I’ve found on OnGestureListener, if a method returns true, then the event should not be propagated to any other listeners. However, despite onDoubleTap() returning true in the code above, you’ll find that if you double-tap on one of the OverlayItem markers, both the double-tap dialog and the marker’s dialog are displayed. It seems the MapView is detecting both a single and double-tap.

If you figure out how to stop double-taps on an OverlayItem from triggering a single tap event, please leave a comment and I’ll update the code in the post…Thanks!

programming android tutorial help mapview
Chris Blunt
Chris Blunt @cblunt
Chris is the founder of Plymouth Software. As well as code and business, he enjoys being a Dad, swimming, and the fine art of drinking tea.